Home Walt Senkow Introduction Walt's Workshop Maverick in Pattern Design Violin Pattern Molds
Home
Walt Senkow Introduction
Walt's Workshop
Maverick in Pattern Design
Violin Pattern Molds
In the News
Violin References / Links
Jay R. Rury Consignments
Senkow Articles/Awards
Testimonials
Violinist Drew Tretick
Fiddle Events
16XX NICOLAUS AMATUS LABELED VIOLIN
1929 LABELED GUIESEPPE ROSSI VIOLIN
LABELED ALFREODUS CONTINO 1914
LABELED 1843 JOSEPH ROCCA 16 IN VIOLA
1819  ALEXANDER ZANTI LABELED VIOLIN
1944 SENKOW VIOLIN
1945 SENKOW VIOLIN
1964 SENKOW VIOLIN
1965 SENKOW VIOLIN (SOLD)
1966 SENKOW VIOLIN
1966 SENKOW VIOLIN
1967 SENKOW VIOLIN
1969 SENKOW VIOLIN (SOLD)
1972 SENKOW VIOLIN
1971 SENKOW VIOLIN
1972 SENKOW VIOLIN
1976 SENKOW VIOLIN
1977 SENKOW VIOLIN
1985 SENKOW VIOLIN
1985 SENKOW VIOLIN
1987 SENKOW VIOLIN
1996 SENKOW VIOLIN
2007 SENKOW VIOLIN
2009 SENKOW VIOLIN*
2009 SENKOW VIOLA 16 1/2 IN
2009 SENKOW VIOLIN
2010 SENKOW VIOLIN
2010 SENKOW VIOLA 16 1/2 IN
2013 SENKOW VIOLIN
2017 SENKOW VIOLIN
Large Photo Gallery -  1971 Senkow Violin Back
Large Photo Gallery - 1944 Senkow Violin
Large Photo Amanti Back
Large Photo  1944 Senkow F Hole
Large Photo Gallery -  1944 Senkow Violin Top
Large Photo  2010 Senkow Viola
Large Photo Amanti Front
Large Photo  2010 Senkow Viola Top
Large Photo  2007 Senkow Violin  Back
Large Photo  2007 Senkow Violin
The Making of a 2013 Senkow Violin (Part 1)
The Making of a 2013 Senkow Violin (Part 2)
AUSTIN STRINGS - 1967 Senkow Violin
On Sale
Guest Book
Contact Us
Letter from son
  

Today Senkow instruments are still being made as the craftsmanship is done by a son of Walt Senkow. It is a tedious process of cutting out a violin pattern on a band saw, using a router and then a sanding wheel to gradually shape out the arching design that is desired. A perfling groove is then cut into the violin plate using a small router with perfling then heated, bent into shape and carefully glued in with the mitter joints carefully done. The choice maple and spruce woods used are all from the Walt Senkow personal collection and are thought to be upwards of 100 years old and European in origin. When the top of a violin plate is achieved, the plate's back side is then sanded out using a sanding wheel along with sharp paint scrapers to make exact specified plate thickness dimensions vertified with measuring calipers. 

The graduation, or thickness, of a violin plate is very important. We believe in paying the utmost care in contouring the top plate especially the outer 2.5 mm thick contour line (as shown in photograph) The process of cutting out the F-Holes starts with exact placement of penciled in outline of F-Holes, using an exacto knife to first cut a line in center of pattern which then allows a throw away nail file in to file outwards to edge of pencil line. This is a very tedious process using also various very small wood files.

. Many violin parts started on, but never finished by Walt Senkow are eventually made into violins today by his son carrying on the Senkow tradition of American violin making excellence.

Site Map